Submit Your Article CMED MEACR meeting
Home Print this page Email this page Users Online: 339
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 


 
 Table of Contents  
LETTERS TO EDITOR
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 84

Bronchoscopic Characterization of Lesions and Use of Technique Accordingly During Bronchoscopy


1 KMT Primary Care Center, Bangkok, Thailand
2 Department of Tropical Medicine, Hainan Medical University, Haikou, China; Department of Biological Science, Joseph Ayobabalola University, Lagos, Nigeria

Date of Web Publication8-Mar-2018

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Sora Yasri
KMT Primary Care Center, Bangkok
Thailand
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ccij.ccij_2_18

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Yasri S, Wiwanitkit V. Bronchoscopic Characterization of Lesions and Use of Technique Accordingly During Bronchoscopy. Clin Cancer Investig J 2018;7:84

How to cite this URL:
Yasri S, Wiwanitkit V. Bronchoscopic Characterization of Lesions and Use of Technique Accordingly During Bronchoscopy. Clin Cancer Investig J [serial online] 2018 [cited 2019 Oct 14];7:84. Available from: http://www.ccij-online.org/text.asp?2018/7/2/84/226845



Dear Editor,





We read the publication on “Characterization of Lesions: Significant impact on lung cancer diagnosis with use of transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) in comparison to conventional diagnostic techniques,” with a great interest.[1] Patil and Rujuta concluded that “Bronchoscopic characterization of lesions and use of technique accordingly during bronchoscopy has a significant outcome in the form of yield; also, it will decrease the need for repeat bronchoscopy.” In fact, use of any additional diagnostic procedure can increase the diagnostic property. Nevertheless, there are some issues for consideration. First, there is an cost of additional procedure. The cost-effectiveness should be evaluated. Second, an additional procedure implies a longer medical procedure. There might be an increased possibility of complication in a more complex procedure. The possible important complications due to additional TBNA are mediastinitis and pneumothorax.[2],[3] A dysfunction of the forceps steering during TBNA is a common pitfall during TBNA procedure that can lead to complications.[4] In case with a very long TBNA procedure, jaw dislocation is a possible unwanted complication.[5] According to a recent report by Oki et al., it requires several passes to get adequate diagnostic materials; hence, there is a high chance of failure of procedure.[6] In conclusion, TBNA might be useful in diagnosis, but there are many considerations on the technique. The study on the cost-effectiveness is required and there is a need to perform further comparative risk and benefit analysis. To increase the efficacy of TBNA, the use of additional real-time endobronchial ultrasound guidance is proven useful.[7]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Patil S, Rujuta A. 'Bronchoscopic characterization of lesions': Significant impact on lung cancer diagnosis with use of transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) in comparison to conventional diagnostic techniques (CDTs). Clin Cancer Investig J 2017;6:239-46.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Basille D, De Dominicis F, Magois E, Andrejak C, Berna P, Jounieaux V, et al. Mediastinitis after endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration. Rev Mal Respir 2017;34:1022-5.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Gnass M, Szlubowski A, Gil T, Kocoń P, Ziętkiewicz M, Twardowska M, et al. Tension pneumothorax as a severe complication of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial fine needle aspiration of mediastinal lymph nodes. Kardiochir Torakochirurgia Pol 2015;12:359-62.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Krenke R, Korczynski P, Gorska K, Chazan R. A pitfall during endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial forceps biopsy of the mediastinal lymph nodes. Ann Thorac Surg 2014;97:e79-80.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Maqsood U, Mills J, Munavvar M. Risk of jaw dislocation with prolonged endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration. J Bronchology Interv Pulmonol 2018;25:e1-2.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Oki M, Saka H, Ando M, Nakashima H, Shiraki A, Murakami Y, et al. How many passes are needed for endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration for sarcoidosis? A Prospective multicenter study. Respiration 2018. [Epub ahead of print].  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Li SY, Chen XB, He Y, Wang JL, Chen Y, Zhong NS, et al. Real-time endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration: Preliminary study on mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes of lung cancer. Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi 2009;89:1672-5.  Back to cited text no. 7
    




 

Top
 
 
  Search
 
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
Access Statistics
Email Alert *
Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)

 
  In this article
References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed562    
    Printed12    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded11    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal