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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1-9

Role of oxidative stress in liver cancer


1 Student Research Committee, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz; Gerash Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Gerash University of Medical Sciences, Gerash, Iran
2 Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Pharmacy School, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran
3 Department of Hematology, Paramedical School, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran
4 Gerash Cellular and Molecular Research Center, Gerash University of Medical Sciences, Gerash, Iran
5 Department of Microbiology, School of Biology, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran
6 Student Research Committee, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences; Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran
7 Department of Environmental Health Engineering, Faculty of Public Health, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran
8 Department of Medical Surgical Nursing, Larestan School of Medical Sciences, Larestan, Iran
9 Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Abbas Farahani
Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ccij.ccij_176_16

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The present article provides an overview of the role of oxidative stress in the development and progression of liver cancer (LC). Oxidative stress ensues when the balance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species overrides the antioxidant defense of the target cell and body fails in detoxifying their harmful effects. Therefore, the interaction of these reactive species with critical cellular macromolecules may cause oxidative damage. Moreover, ROS may interact with cellular components including proteins, lipids, and DNAs, which results in altered target cell function. The accumulation of oxidative damage products has been implicated in both acute and chronic cell injury suggesting a possible role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis, heart failure, myocardial infarction, and cancers. Alcoholism, viral agents, obesity, and smoking increase the occurrence of oxidative stress and consequently the risk of LC.


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